Comprehensive School Improvement Plan

Needs Assessment

Section 1 – Description of school community:

 Coyote Trail Elementary

Marana, Arizona

            Coyote Trail Elementary is an elementary school located in the growing community of Marana, Arizona. Currently, Marana has a population of 49,680. Coyote Trail Elementary serves 506 students in PreK-6 and is part of the Marana Unified School District (MUSD). MUSD has 18 schools; 10 elementary schools, one K-8 school, one CSTEM K-8 school, two middle schools, three high schools and one alternative school. 

Description of School Community

            Marana is a growing community with a current population of 49,680. The average median age of the community is 39 years old, 21% of the community is 65 years or older and ages 0-19 make up 32% of the Marana community[TP1] . The average annual household income is $93,654. 83% of homes within the community are owned and 17% are rented. 52% of the population over the age of 25 have a college or advanced degree. 19,722 households make up the [TP2] Marana community, 73.46% of them are family households influencing enrollment within the community public and charter schools. The student demographic makeup of Coyote Trail Elementary is 52.37% White, 36.96% Hispanic, 2.77% Asian, 2.17% African American, and 5.73% Two or More Races. Coyote Trail Elementary does not qualify as a Title 1 school. Since 1996, Coyote Trail has been a staple within the Marana community creating an environment of academic rigor and opportunities to foster life-long learners and leaders.

School Description

            Coyote Trail Elementary PreK-6 is a brick-and-mortar school with permanent classrooms in seven buildings and four modular buildings on one gated campus ground. The campus also includes a covered preschool playground, a covered kindergarten playground, a covered sensory playground, a covered large playground, two large playing fields for physical education and outdoor sports, a baseball field with dugouts and bleachers, and two outdoor basketball courts, ecology learning area that includes an orchard, chicken [TP3] coop, tortoise enclosure, pollination garden, worm bin, two large cisterns, composting bin and eight raised garden beds. A multi-purpose space is shared for the cafeteria and school events. In addition to the multi-purpose space, an outdoor amphitheater is utilized for school events as well. The front office building includes a large library and makerspace classroom. The MUSD district professional development modular building shares space in the Coyote Trail parking lot.     [TP4]   

Certified Staffing

  • 1 Principal
  • 1 Associate Principal
  • 1 School Psychologist
  • 1 Teaching and Technology Coach
  • 2 Reading Specialists
  • 1 Speech Teacher
  • 1 Occupational Therapist
  • 1 Deaf/Hard of Hearing Teacher
  • 1 English Language Teacher
  • 1 School Counselor
  • 1 Librarian
  • 1 Music Teacher
  • 1 Physical Education Teacher
  • 2 Special Education Resource Teachers
  • 2 Special Education Mild-Moderate Intellectual Disability Teachers
  • 2 Preschool Teachers  
  • 1 Kindergarten Bright Start* Teacher
  • 2 Kindergarten Teachers
  • 1 First Grade Bright Start* Teacher
  • 3 First Grade Teachers
  • 1 Second Grade Bright Start* Teacher
  • 2 Second Grade Teachers
  • 2 Third Grade Teachers
  • 1 Third/Fourth Grade Multi-Age Gifted and Talented Teacher
  • 3 Fourth Grade Teachers
  • 1 Fifth/Sixth Grade Multi-Age Gifted and Talented Teacher
  • 2 Fifth Grade Teachers
  • 3 Sixth Grade Teachers 

* Bright Start is a Gifted and Talented program for grades K-2[TP5] 

Support Staffing

  • 1 Site Secretary
  • 1 Attendance Clerk
  • 1 Nurse
  • 3 Office Aides
  • 1 Librarian Assistant
  • 2 Crossing Guards
  • 1 Maintenance
  • 1 Groundskeeper
  • 1 Technology Support
  • 2 Resource Teacher Aides
  • 12 Special Education Aides[TP6] 
  • 3 Cafeteria Staff  

Strengths and Challenges of Coyote Trail Elementary

Strengths  

  • [TP7] 
  • Gifted & Talented Program (GEM) grades 3-6 & Bright Start Program grades K-2
  • BRIDGE (Inclusion Program for Students with Autism)
  • Same principal for 25 years[TP8] 
  • Teacher Retention

Challenges

  •  New Assistant Principal
  • K-3 low reading achievement scores
  • Rate of low achievers is increasing – widening the achievement gap
  • Lack of school wide implementation of Project Based Learning
  • Status quo has been established

Critical Analysis of Recent Intervention

What are the recent interventions that the school has undertaken to address students’

learning needs?

  • Purchased & implemented new Guided Reading K-6/ Literacy Footprints Curriculum K-3
  • Implemented district wide Eureka Math Curriculum K-6/ Small Group Math Instruction
  • Implemented new Project/Problem Based Learning Model
  • Expanded Bright Start K-2 Program along with Expanded Gifted and Talented 3-6 Program

How long have they been in effect?

  • Purchased & implemented new Guided Reading K-6/ Literacy Footprints Curriculum K-3 and during the 2020-2021 SY to be used during the 2021-2022 SY
  • Implemented district wide Eureka Math Curriculum K-6/ Small Group Math during the 2017-2018 SY
  • Implemented new Project/Problem Based Learning Model during the 2019-2020 SY
  • Continued Bright Start K-2 Program along with Expanded Gifted and Talented 3-6 Program during the 2017-2018 SY

What have been the results of these interventions?

  • Guided Reading K-6/ Literacy Footprints Curriculum K-3 – in beginning stages of implementation, program has been added to PD calendar
  • Eureka Math Curriculum K-6/ Small Group Math Instruction – strong focus on small group instruction, will use AzMerit to data to assess effectiveness
  • Project/Problem Based Learning Model – Aside from the GEM teachers, there is no evidence that all teachers are using the PBL model or there is not teacher buy-in
  • Continue Bright Start K-2 Program along with Expanded Gifted and Talented 3-6 Program – Students in same cohort have evidence of continued growth

What is working?

  • Guided Reading K-6/ Literacy Footprints Curriculum K-3 – There is teacher buy-in, students are receiving instruction twice a day by the reading specialist and in the general education classroom
  • Eureka Math Curriculum K-6/ Small Group Math Instruction – Common math language is being used across the school
  • Project/Problem Based Learning Model – community is being built and real life experiences are being made with the students; student achievement has increased with the inclusive gifted program
  • Bright Start K-2 Program along with Expanded Gifted and Talented 3-6 Program  – increased enrollment; highly sought after program[TP9] ; offers accelerated math within the program; identifying gifted students sooner and identifying twice exceptional students

What is the likelihood of their success in the long term?

  • [TP10] K-6/ Literacy Footprints Curriculum K-3 – Program will be part of a 3 year pilot to gather data in consistency in curriculum; anticipated increased AzMerit scores in ELA
  • Eureka Math Curriculum K-6/ Small Group Math Instruction – District intuitive to have consistency in curriculum; anticipated increased AzMerit scores in math
  • [TP11] –  Will now be district driven; mindset of teachers need to change; with continued community involvement model is expected to amongst teachers; model provides higher level thinking
  • Bright Start K-2 Program along with Expanded Gifted and Talented 3-6 Program – The program is at risk of being closed within 2 to 3 years due to declining enrollment

Section 2 – School Data:   

English Language Arts (ELA)

Input: According to the AzMerit ELA test scores from 2019, 74% of the special education students are minimally proficient in ELA. 32% of students with income eligibility 1 and 2 scored minimally proficient, which made up the second highest group. 24% of Hispanic students scored minimally proficient, while only 20% of white students scored in the minimally proficient category. Of all students tested, 21% of female students and 22% of male students scored minimally proficient.

Output: Looking at the data, continuous training on the alternative AzMerit testing for students in the special education program needs to be provided to the special education teachers and paraprofessionals so that they are aware of the format of the test. Additionally, our school has applied for Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) funding to support a summer academic camp for current MUSD students. [TP12] With this funding, we will be able to provide additional support in ELA, math, science, social studies and the arts. This camp will be free of charge for current students. Students who scored minimally proficient on AzMerit will be highly encouraged to attend the summer camp. Students who do not meet proficiency in ELA will participate in reading intervention classes during the school day, such as Response to Intervention (RTI) [TP13] in Reading. Each grade level will also create leveled reading subgroups where the students will work in smaller groups with the classroom teacher or reading specialist teacher in order to work on specific ELA reading standards. Quarterly benchmark results will be used to determine necessary accommodations to leveled reading subgroups.

MATH

Input: According to the AzMerit math test scores from 2019, 64% of the special education students are minimally proficient in math. 41% of students with income eligibility 1 and 2 scored minimally proficient, which again made up the second highest group. 32% of Hispanic students scored minimally proficient, while only 19% of white students scored in the minimally proficient category. Of all students tested, 26% of female students and 23% of male students scored minimally proficient.

Output: Looking at the data, continuous training on the alternative AzMerit testing for students in the special education program needs to be provided to the special education teachers and the paraprofessionals so they are aware of the format of the test. Additionally, our school has applied for Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) funding to support a summer academic camp for current MUSD students. With this funding, we will be able to provide additional support in ELA, math, science, social studies and the arts. This camp will be free of charge for current students. Students who scored minimally proficient on AzMerit will be highly encouraged to attend the summer camp. Students who do not meet proficiency in math will participate in math intervention classes during the school day. Each grade level will spend a portion of their day working in smaller groups with the classroom teacher, math specialist, or math tutor in order to work on specific math standards. In order to meet this need, our school is assessing our budget to determine if a math specialist can be hired; but in the meantime, we will reach out to our stakeholders asking for volunteers to provide math tutoring services. Quarterly benchmark results will be used to determine necessary accommodations to math subgroups.

Demographics: The following table shows the math scores by student demographics

Project Based Learning (PBL) Building Initiative

 Input: Through formal and informal walkthroughs, administration noted only a small percent of teachers took on this newly adopted initiative. Those teachers tend to be the teachers in the Bright Start and the self-contained Gifted and Talented (GEM) programs. [TP14] Teachers in the Bright Start and GEM Program tend to naturally teach using PBL techniques so there was no need to change their teaching style. The PBL program has a foundation of being student driven so it was also natural for the students in the Bright Start and GEM programs to participate in PBL. By contrast, general education teachers had difficulty in changing their teaching style to reflect the PBL model [TP15] and continue to encounter difficulty with scaffolding the units for lower level students.

Output: In order to increase the number of teachers implementing the PBL model, our school needs to provide moretraining and professional development (PD) to the teachers so they are more familiar with the model and how to scaffold the units to meet the needs of the students in their classrooms. We also commit to providing the teachers with release time where they can observe their colleagues implementing the PBL model in [TP16] PD time where teachers can highlight their projects to their colleagues. Lastly, we will offer incentives for a teacher’s implementation of the PBL model by offering weekly drawings for gift cards or comp time.

Demographics: The following table shows the percent of teachers currently implementing PBL.

Section 3 – Analysis of recent interventions:

What are the recent interventions that the school has undertaken to address students’

learning needs?

  • Purchased & implemented new Guided Reading K-6/ Literacy Footprints Curriculum K-3
  • Implemented district wide Eureka Math Curriculum K-6/ Small Group Math Instruction
  • Implemented new Project/Problem Based Learning Model
  • Expanded Bright Start K-2 Program along with Expanded Gifted and Talented 3-6 Program

How long have they been in effect?

  • Purchased & implemented new Guided Reading K-6/ Literacy Footprints Curriculum K-3 and during the 2020-2021 SY to be used during the 2021-2022 SY
  • Implemented district wide Eureka Math Curriculum K-6/ Small Group Math during the 2017-2018 SY
  • Implemented new Project/Problem Based Learning Model during the 2019-2020 SY
  • Continued Bright Start K-2 Program along with Expanded Gifted and Talented 3-6 Program during the 2017-2018 SY

What have been the results of these interventions?

  • Guided Reading K-6/ Literacy Footprints Curriculum K-3 – in beginning stages of implementation, program has been added to PD calendar
  • Eureka Math Curriculum K-6/ Small Group Math Instruction – strong focus on small group instruction, will use AzMerit to data to assess effectiveness
  • Project/Problem Based Learning Model – Aside from the GEM teachers, there is no evidence that all teachers are using the PBL model or there is not teacher buy-in
  • Continue Bright Start K-2 Program along with Expanded Gifted and Talented 3-6 Program – Students in same cohort have evidence of continued growth

What is working?

  • Guided Reading K-6/ Literacy Footprints Curriculum K-3 – There is teacher buy-in, students are receiving instruction twice a day by the reading specialist and in the general education classroom
  • Eureka Math Curriculum K-6/ Small Group Math Instruction – Common math language is being used across the school
  • Project/Problem Based Learning Model – community is being built and real-life experiences are being made with the students; student achievement has increased with the inclusive gifted program
  • Bright Start K-2 Program along with Expanded Gifted and Talented 3-6 Program – increased enrollment; highly sought-after program; offers accelerated math within the program; identifying gifted students sooner and identifying twice exceptional students

What is the likelihood of their success in the long term?

  • Guided Reading K-6/ Literacy Footprints Curriculum K-3 – Program will be part of a 3-year pilot to gather data in consistency in curriculum; anticipated increased AzMerit scores in ELA
  • Eureka Math Curriculum K-6/ Small Group Math Instruction – District intuitive to have[TP17] [TP18]  consistency in curriculum; anticipated increased AzMerit scores in math
  • Project/Problem Based Learning Model – Will now be district driven; mindset of teachers need to change; with continued community involvement model is expected to amongst teachers; model provides higher level thinking [TP19] 
  • Bright Start K-2 Program along with Expanded Gifted and Talented 3-6 Program – The program is at risk of being closed within 2 to 3 years due to declining enrollment

Section 4 – Stakeholder Engagement (NELP 5.1):

Who?

The following have been identified as stakeholders at our school:

  • Students
  • Parents
  • Families
  • Teachers
  • Staff
  • Community Members
  • Businesses
  • Alumni – students, staff and faculty
  • School Administration
  • District Administration

Why?

            The stakeholders were identified because their input into the needs of Coyote Trail is vital and warranted. Trust must be developed between the stakeholders and the school in order to have a productive, collaborative partnership to identify the needs of the school community and work to address those needs in the most effective manner possible. The success of Coyote Trail students is dependent upon the active participation of the stakeholders. Each stakeholder is able to bring information and solutions to the table to create a plan that is sustainable and will offer [TP20] positive lasting changes to our school community.

Where?

            A majority of the stakeholder engagements will be held on the Coyote Trail campus, but the times and event types will vary to allow for more opportunities for the stakeholders to participate. Examples of engagement opportunities include: school town hall meetings, parent-teacher conferences, school open house, school and student festivals and events, parent teacher organization (PTO) meetings, volunteer opportunities and participation on school committees. Additional stakeholder engagements will occur off-campus at district board meetings and district wide community events, such as the district’s feeder school Fall Festival, community outreach and support, and community donation drives.[TP21] 

How?

How have stakeholders been involved with developing recent interventions?

The reading specialist teacher collaborated with grade level teachers to discuss academic needs. Building Literacy Footprints was decided upon as a guided reading program, piloted for one year with one grade level and then purchased for grades K-3. Through results found in the Marana Unified School District family annual school climate survey, parents indicated a need for a common math curriculum across the district. [TP22] District administration adopted Eureka Math and provided teacher Professional Development K-12 on instructional implementation of small group math instruction. 

 How would you propose to involve stakeholders (staff, parents, students, district personnel, community members) in identifying the school’s needs?

Coyote Trail would like to involve the stakeholders in identifying our school’s needs by holding town hall meetings with the community, providing all stakeholders with annual school climate surveys, having an active PTO, encouraging participation at school events, offering parent academic support events, and utilizing social media. Data analysis teams and building leadership teams should include community members on the committee. We would also encourage and increase participation at school open house and parent-teacher conferences. Incentives, such as free advertising, could be offered to local businesses in exchange for their support of Coyote Trail and our students. Through their involvement in these events, stakeholders will begin to identify our school’s needs and will be able to provide valuable feedback and work to provide solutions.

What influence?

What processes should be in place to provide stakeholders with ongoing opportunities for input/feedback on instructional issues, and to build stakeholder support for new interventions to improve student learning?

An annual school climate survey, created by the district, needs to be a well-established tool used to involve stakeholders in their ongoing evaluation of the school’s needs. Results from these surveys will be displayed on the school’s website to be reviewed, analyzed and [TP23] used to create annual building goals in a partnership with the stakeholders and not in isolation. These goals will be reviewed at least quarterly with all stakeholders to ensure that all stakeholders have a common vision and mission, as well as to assess our progress in meeting the goals.

In an effort to meet our school goals, Coyote Trail will offer stakeholders with on campus volunteer opportunities where they can provide tutoring services, clerical assistance, student mentorship and classroom support to meet the school’s goals they helped create. Stakeholders will also be encouraged to utilize and highlight their talents, trades and skills on and [TP24] off campus with opportunities to support the school and students. For example, a carpenter or landscaper could support the school’s ecology program, a graphic designer could support the school in creating pamphlets and banners, and support the technology coach in creating technology [TP25] lessons. Lastly, the stakeholders would be strongly encouraged to be active participants in the PTO.

Section 5 – Equity Audit (NELP 3.2):

Teacher Quality Equity4 indicators to account for in chart / table form:

  1. Teacher education by degree

                        50% hold a Bachelor’s degree

49% hold a Master’s degree

1% hold a Doctoral degree

  • Teacher mobility: 2 teachers left during the 2018-2019 school year
  • Teacher certification: 100% of teachers are certified through the Arizona Department of Education

Programmatic EquityQuality of the programs where students are placed or excluded – 4 indicators to account for in chart / table form:

  1. Special Education            12[TP27] %
  2. Gifted and Talented education     6 %
  3. Bilingual education                       2 %
  4. Student discipline             Labeled: children with disability and children without disability (in a table on following page)

Achievement Equity – 4 indicators to account for in chart / table form:

2019 state achievement test results in math

  • Attendance Rates: 2018-2019  SY was 94.3%

Section 6 – Priority Needs:

What are the priority needs where progress is essential at this time?  What needs must be addressed before other less urgent priorities are tackled?   

The first priority of Coyote Trail is to increase our AzMerit ELA test scores. To meet this goal, we need to implement the K-3 guided reading program, Building Literacy Footprints, in order to build the foundational reading skills that the students will need. The Data Analysis team [TP28] needs to analyze data, both quantitative and qualitative, to determine the needs of the students and provide support. Parent and family engagement provided through Reading Nights each semester will create a sense of responsibility in learning for not only students, but for their families as well. It also ensures that any additional education or support parents are needing in order to provide support at home has been addressed. This will include information on emergent, readers, early readers, transitional readers, and fluent readers.  [TP29] 

The second priority of our school is to improve our AzMerit math scores. To meet this goal, we will assess our budget and hire a math specialist, solicit stakeholders to volunteer and offer math tutoring and support as well as continue teacher Similarly to the Reading Nights, we will also offer Math Nights once a semester for students, parents and their families.

Our site’s third goal is to increase the number of teachers implementing the PBL[TP31]  model in their classrooms. To meet this goal, ongoing district-led PD will be provided for all teachers at Coyote Trail. With administration support, teachers will learn how to utilize the necessary components of the PBL model in order to provide the much-needed support for not only their students, but for each other as well.  [TP32] 

SMART GOALS 

SMART Goal in ELA

70% of Coyote Trail students in grades 3, 4, 5, scoring minimally proficient on the AzM2 ELA test portion, will increase their proficiency level by 3% each year measured in June 2022, June 2023, and June 2024.

SMART Goal in Math

50% of Coyote Trail students in grades 3, 4, 5, scoring minimally proficient on the AzM2 Math test portion, will increase their proficiency level by 3% each year measured in June 2022, June 2023, and June 2024.

SMART Goal in PBL

40% of Coyote Trail teachers will integrate Science, Social Studies and English Language Arts through the implementation of the instructional model of Project Based Learning (PBL) as measured by the teacher evaluation Danielson Framework, informal, and formal observations to increase by 5% each year measured in June 2022, June 2023, and June 2024.

3-year Comprehensive School Improvement Plan  

Goal #1: ELA
70% of Coyote Trail students in grades 3, 4, 5, scoring minimally proficient on the AzM2 ELA test portion, will increase their proficiency level by 3% each year measured in June 2022, June 2023, and June 2024.
Data Source/Evidence
2019 AzM2 ELA State Testing Results, Dibels Scores, and 2020 Synergy Quarterly Assessment Data[TP34] 
Improvement Plan
StrategyAction StepsTime FramePerson(s) Responsible
Form Data Analysis Team (DAT)Review Building Leadership Funds to stipend DAT position, [TP35] solicit volunteers from K-3 for DAT (3-year commitment), schedule bi-weekly DAT meetings for 2021-2022 school yearSummer July 2021Jenna Bissonette, Associate Principal; Shannon Carmichael, Reading Specialist
K-3 Guided Reading Professional Development (PD)Schedule “Getting Started With Literacy Footprints” PDBeginning of year 2021-2022 teacher in-service trainingJenna Bissonette, Associate Principal; Shannon Carmichael, Reading Specialist; K-3 grade teachers
Family Literacy NightPlan and coordinate Family Literacy Night highlighting reading strategies parents can utilize at home with beginning, emergent, transitional, and fluent readersOctober 1, 2021[TP36] Jenna Bissonette, Associate Principal; DAT; Building Leadership Team (BLT); Trish Arnold, Librarian; K-3 teacher representative; Parent Teachers and Friends (PTF)
Goal #2: Math
50% of Coyote Trail students in grades 3, 4, 5, scoring minimally proficient on the AzM2 Math test portion, will increase their proficiency level by 3% each year measured in June 2022, June 2023, and June 2024.
Data Source/Evidence
2019 AzM2 Results Math portion of State Testing, 2020 Synergy Quarterly Assessment Data
Improvement Plan
StrategyAction StepsTime FramePerson(s) Responsible
Assess School BudgetHire Math Specialist//Solicit [TP37] Stakeholders for Tutoring Volunteer OpportunitiesSix to Three Weeks Before School StartsDan Johnson-School Principal; Jenna Bissonette-Associate Principal
School-wide Math Professional DevelopmentCalendar Professional Development-Small Group Math Instruction/Offer Math Fun Family Nights (parent trainings)PD-First Week of School Math Family Nights-Beginning of Each SemesterJenna Bissonette-Associate Principal; Newly Hired Math Specialist
Review of Math Materials, Curriculum, Technology Resources, And Hands On LearningImplement grade-level Data Dig In [TP38] Order To Review Eureka Math Curriculum To Check For Possible Correlation Between Test Scores and Implementation of CurriculumThird Week of SchoolDan Johnson-School Principal; Jenna Bissonette-Associate Principal; Grade-Level Team Leads: Leigh Pitts 3rd, Brittany Rucker 4th, Lisa Julle 5th; Newly Hired Math Specialist
Goal #3: Project Based Learning
40% of Coyote Trail teachers will integrate Science, Social Studies and English Language Arts through the implementation of the instructional model of Project Based Learning (PBL) as measured by the teacher evaluation Danielson Framework, informal, and formal observations to increase by 5% each year measured in June 2022, June 2023, and June 2024.
Data Source/Evidence
Teacher evaluation – Danielson Framework; informal and formal observations, Professional Development PBL showcases
Improvement Plan
StrategyAction StepsTime FramePerson(s) Responsible
School wide staff PD: Teaching the PBL model[TP39] PBL Model training added to PD calendarFirst month of the school year at the weekly PD meetingsDan Johnson, Principal; Kristi Rucker, Curriculum Service Provider; Jenna Bissonette, Associate Principal
Informal observations of teachers using PBL model to be observed by other teachersProvide release time for teachersOne te[TP40] acher a week each week until all teachers have had an opportunity to observeDan Johnson, Principal; Kristi Rucker, Curriculum Service Provider; Jenna Bissonette, Associate Principal
PBL unit/project showcasesCreate a schedule of teachers who will present their PBL projects[TP41] Once a month during PD time until all teachers have had an opportunity to presentAll Coyote Trail teachers; Dan Johnson, Principal; Kristi Rucker, Curriculum Service Provider; Jenna Bissonette, Associate Principal
Incentivize teachers who use the PBL modelProvide comp time; give-away gift cards; solicit businesses for donationsThis is ongoing and continuous throughout the school yearDan Johnson, Principal; Kristi Rucker, Curriculum Service Provider; Jenna Bissonette, Associate Principal

 Interesting.

 Very impressive stats.

 Awesome!

 Nice.

 Very few districts have this.

 Impressive numbers.

 Wow!

 Also – not usual.

I can imagine.

 Exceptional that this is still used. Proven to be highly effective.

 Marana is cutting edge with this!

 Interesting.

 Will address the tipping point.

 This is pretty typical, but will be awesome if in almost, if not all, classrooms.

 This is not surprising, pretty consistent in most districts.

 Impressive plan.

 When consistent, growth and stability occurs.

Fits perfectly with STEM and CTE at an early age!

 Comprehensive list of stakeholders.

 A full and busy year to provide many opportunities for all stakeholders to be involved at some time during the year.

 Great to see that parents addressed this on the annual survey.

 As school leaders, we should be transparent. This garners trust as we educate our stakeholders. (It also helps when districts ask for passing of bonds and overrides.)

 Nice.

 Well thought out involvement.

 Again, stability make the difference in achievement, especially if willing to change their instructional mindset.

 Pretty well aligned to national averages, except gifted is double. Nice!

 Data dig to really prove this perhaps.

 Do you all use Accelerated Reader or some form of reading incentive program?

 Good to see this in math and not just reading.

 Marana will become the model district!

 NEEDS ASSESSMENT: Exceptional work ladies. You have identified needs for a real school. Unique to address the PBL. (What if every school in the nation focused on PBL – the US would soar!)

Exceptional work. Grade: A

Well written SMART goals. Specific and measurable.

Good to see multiple data sources.

Such an important position for data mining and data use to drive instruction.

 When it’s scheduled, it should happen!

 Could work well with DAT

 Excellent – and then to purchase materials to support needs (and wants)

 A model that will be cutting edge and can bring the school the A+ School of Excellence recognition once you have 3 years of data. Be sure to take pre-implementation data!!!

 Always good for teachers to be given the opportunity to be in one another’s classrooms.

 Impressive to keep the momentum going.

Ladies – your school improvement plan addresses math and ELA which is aligned to most, right. The uniqueness of PBL will set the school apart from other school districts!

Excellent plan!  Grade: A

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